Canadian National Parks are No Place for Your Drone

 

Even though spring will soon be here, packing your drone up with your camping gear or picnic supplies for a trip through one of Canada’s national parks is still a no-go.

Parks Canada prohibits the recreational flight of drones in Canada’s national parks. Drone flight within the parks is cited as a potential source of danger for wildlife and visitors, according to the Parks Canada website.

Non-recreational use is permitted in some circumstances; it requires the advanced permission of the Parks Canada Field Unit Superintendent, as well as adherence to the requirements for drone flight set out in the Canadian Aviation Regulations.

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PHOTO: Drone Thought Leaders Speakers Series – Advances in the Drone Industry – March 28, 2018

Thank you to everyone that joined us for the Drone Thought Leaders Speakers Series – Advances in the Drone Industry on March 28, 2018. Our industry-leading speakers, Tom Hanson of the Sky Guys, Bashir Khan of Scorpiox Technologies and Hartley Lefton of Dentons, enlightened us all with their views and expertise!

Join us soon for the next Drone Thought Leaders Speakers Series event!

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VIDEO: Drones to the Rescue – Australian Coast Guard Uses Drone to Rescue Swimmers

The Australian coast guard happened to be conducting drone flight tests when two teenage boys were found to be in distress and caught in an ocean swell. The quick thinking operator was able to drop a self-inflating life raft from a drone 800ft above the distressed swimmers. Ultimately, they made it to safety.

Read about it further in the Toronto Star and CBC.

 

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Is the drone services operator I hired an independent contractor or employee of my business? Key reasons why the distinction matters

I. Introduction

When it comes to hiring a drone operator, there is no shortage of work-for-hire subcontractors in Canada.  Given the level of skill, technology and regulatory compliance required to operate drones, hiring a commercial drone operator is often the most cost-effective method of incorporating drones into your business.

However, when hiring a drone operator, businesses should be careful to ensure that they are characterized as “independent contractors” – not as “employees”. The main reason that a business should not unwittingly allow a drone services operator to be considered an employee is because employers owe certain legal duties to their employees, and employees have specific legal rights that independent contractors do not.

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Drone thought leaders speaker series – Advances in the drone industry

Drones – or “unmanned aerial vehicles” – are advancing at a blistering pace. Technological improvements have made drones safer, more accessible, user-friendly and cheaper. Taking to the skies resolves logistical problems, allows for the delivering of goods, permits the collection of mass data and will soon permit passenger travel. These developments represent a paradigm shift in many industries, including: transportation, media and entertainment, mining, agriculture, insurance and logistics.

Join us as we consider a wide-range of topics including:

  • Regulatory insights – what regulations are expected to change and when?
  • Using drones in your business – how can it be done safely and efficiently?
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Hiring a drone services provider? Key liability risks for your business

Businesses that contract for drone services are not necessarily shielded from liability if the drone operator breaks the law. In many ways, the purchaser of drone services is a passive participant in the flight and the drone operator’s actions. The prudent business owner contracting for drone services should consider the various sources of potential liability. Below, we provides some strategies for businesses to manage these risks.

Non-compliance with the Canadian Aviation Regulations

First and foremost, a drone services provider must comply with drone regulations. In general, the Canadian Aviation Regulations (CARs) prescribe offences for conducting drone operations that violates principles of aviation safety.

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Recent development in drone delivery commercialization in Canada

On December 15, 2017, Toronto-based technology company Drone Delivery Canada (DDC) announced that Transport Canada has accepted the company’s declaration of compliance for the X1000 Sparrow (Sparrow). The Sparrow is a cargo delivery drone, and the first of its kind to be accepted under Transport Canada’s program for compliant unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The news represents a step forward in the provision of commercial drone delivery services in Canada.

As reported in an earlier blog post, DDC has plans in motion to launch the first commercial drone delivery service in Canada. Currently in its test phase, the pilot program will deliver food, mail and medical supplies via drones to the remote Moose Cree First Nation Community situated in Northern Ontario.

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